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As we reflect on the topic of raising the next generation, it is worth to consider this verse in Deut 4.9:

Only be careful, and watch yourselves closely so that you do not forget the things your eyes have seen or let them fade from your heart as long as you live. Teach them to your children and to their children after them.

What does passing the faith on to future generations encompass? God reminds us in His Word that firstly, it begins with ourselves. We are to be careful, or to give heed to ourselves, and to watch ourselves closely, or to keep our souls diligently. Why is this important? Our life is our best witness to the generations after us, not our achievements, not our words or teachings, but the way we live our lives.

Secondly, we are reminded not to forget the things we have experienced, or let them fade (or slip, depart) from our hearts, not just when we are young, or when those God-moments happen, but for as long as we live. In the immediate context, God was reminding the Israelites through Moses not to forget what He had done for them by freeing them from slavery and bondage to Egypt and Pharaoh, and the eventual leading to the Promised Land. The same applies for us. Do we remember when we received Jesus as our Saviour and Lord? Do we remind ourselves (and our children) of all that He has done to save us? Do we keep it at the forefront as our motivation for obedience and service to the Lord?

Lastly, we are exhorted to teach God’s laws and what He has done to our children and their children. This does not just apply to Christian parents, but to the whole body of Christ, that God has placed us and younger generations together in. As teachers, as leaders, as a church community, we all have a role and responsibility to live godly and exemplary lives and to teach others to do so, for the sake of Christ and God’s glory. May God help us to connect to His Word, commit to Him and be His people, shining His light and love wherever we go.

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Grace & truth

Much has been debated recently regarding Singapore’s Penal Code, in particular Section 377A, following the recent decision by the Indian Supreme Court to rule in favour of decriminalising homosexuality. Several individuals (including prominent public figures) and groups have weighed in on both sides in print and online media platforms, and some have even been aggressively garnering support for online petitions either to support or repeal. What follows is a personal reflection on this pertinent and controversial topic, and by no means reflects our church’s official position. The intention here is also not to debate on a theological level, as if to prove or defend my position on 377A or homosexuality. Instead, my hope is that it will encourage reflection of our own personal response, suggesting a more balanced approach towards this and related issues.

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Crazy rich Christians

“Crazy Rich Asians,” a Warner Brothers adaptation of Kevin Kwan’s best-selling novel has taken the world by storm since its premiere in mid-August. In 3 weeks, the film has become the most successful Hollywood studio romantic comedy in nearly a decade at the U.S. box office, topping the charts for the third weekend in a row, already raking in an estimated total of USD 1 million. Amidst its many themes are the extravagant lifestyles of the rich and famous in Asia, the importance of traditional family values, pedigree, connections and being part of the “in” crowd. One major theme is that of “inheritance” (or “old money”), in which the male protagonist is essentially modern day royalty, primed from a young age to take over his father’s legacy – his business empire, wealth and assets, and family name. Watching and reading interviews done with the author, it is apparent that much of his novels were based on personal experience as well.
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I believe … in the Church

Recently at church camp, the speaker mentioned about the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed of A.D. 381 in his discussion about the mission of the church, where it states, “I believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church.” Traditionally, these have come to be known as the Four Marks or Attributes of the Church. As we explore the Book of Acts, particularly the life of the early church, it is worth considering what each of these attributes mean for us and the church.

Firstly, “one” suggests a sense of oneness in the body, the Church, through what Christians have in common. The song “People of the Lord” which begins, “There is one body” (from Eph. 4:5-6) reminds us of the unity we are to preserve as we proclaim His praises, for the sake of Christ. Are we as churches guilty of building up our own little kingdoms, instead of building up the kingdom of God? Is our love marked by unity, so that others see us as disciples of Christ, bearing His image and reflecting His character and glory in our lives and ministries?
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Today marks exactly 10 years in total that, by God’s grace and enabling, I have served the Lord in full-time ministry. The journey began earlier though, since May 2003, when I first started out as a ministry staff in my home church. In the span of the past 15 years, apart from the 10 years in ministry (including close to 6 years as a pastor), I have also studied for 3 years and graduated from bible college, gotten married and became a parent of 4 children, and served mainly in missions, youth & young adults, and Christian education in both church and parachurch environments. Looking back, it sometimes feels like a lifetime since it all started, but it also seems as though time has flew by quickly. Here are some reflections and lessons learnt along the way.
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